YOUR SPANISH WORLD

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As a former Spanish language teacher, Faith Chiwawana developed a love for Spanish language and Culture. In 2009      she was diagnosed with end-stage renal disease. She started     in-center homo-dialysis immediately.  In this beginner’s guide          to life on Dialysis Faith Chiwawana shares content in Spanish   and English for medical dialysis personnel. 


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LIST OF CHAPTERS 

  • Spanish for receptionists 
  • Spanish for dialysis nurses/technicians 
  • Spanish for dialysis nephrologists 
  • Spanish for nurse practitioners 
  • Spanish for dialysis nutritionists 
  • Spanish for dialysis social workers


  • INTRODUCTION:  In order to effectively serve Spanish-speaking patients, the Dialysis professional must develop empathy for the client. Imagine someone telling you that you have a life-threatening chronic disease. Furthermore, your command of the English language may be limited. You may be intimidated to ask questions. Many Spanish-speaking patients may not be legally here in the United States. When servicing these clients these factors must be taken into consideration. Some Spanish-speaking clients may have English-speaking relatives who can interpret for them, but many do not. Being able to communicate basic things in Spanish will make this frightening experience more bearable.  


 

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. SPANISH FOR CHRISTIAN MINISTRY will give its reader basic terms used to witness and minister to Spanish speaking people. It is by no means intended to cover every situation which may occur when communicating with people who speak Spanish. It is a basic foundation from which one can build on.  


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  • Before I discuss cultural differences when ministering to Spanish-speaking people, let me make it very clear that my intention is not to stereotype any group of people. My purpose for including this section is to empower my readers with some cultural knowledge that will assist them in ministering to Spanish-speaking people.  First of all Spanish-speaking people are very family oriented. It is very common when meeting them for the first time to talk about their families and your family.  Once they get to know you, they may invite you to their home for a meal. If you decline, they may be offended. The extended family still exists in most of their cultures. They will feel more comfortable and trust you quicker if you ask them about their families. Spanish-speaking people’s concept of time can also be different. They often see nothing wrong with being late. The concept of “rushing things sometimes really is foreign to them. This is very different than English concept of time. Their personal space boundaries are different also. A Spanish -speaking person may physically talk to you at a closer range than an English-speaking person. This may be uncomfortable at first and take getting used to. Once they get to know you, they may greet you with a kiss on the cheek. This is not considered flirting or offensive in their cultures. With regard to religion, many Spanish-speaking countries are still predominately Catholic. Even people that don’t consider themselves religious have a great regard and respect for the Roman Catholic Church. One must be aware of this when ministering the Gospel to them.


Purchase books on Amazon.com 

www.barnesandnoble.com

googlebooks.com

kindle, Nook, or your preferred e-book reader

or contact author for signed copies